What is ARM?

ARM stands for Advanced RISC Machine and is a design company that makes processors. These processors are designed to run low power while being fast, which makes them great for portable devices such as phones or tablets.

ARM was originally founded in 1985 by Steve Furber who also co-designed the Acorn computers used at Cambridge University. ARM is now one of the most popular processor manufacturers in the world with over 95% market share in mobile devices like phones, tablets, and wearables.

In addition to their own designs, they license their designs out to other companies like Apple so that they can make iPhones and iPads faster than ever before with better battery life!

ARM processors are not weak, even though they can’t do everything that an Intel processor could. Mobile devices have grown more powerful in recent years and the trend shows no sign of slowing down!

The ARM architecture is a standard that’s maintained by the company, ARM. This company licenses their own designs for processors to other manufacturers such as Samsung and Qualcomm! The Apple A-series processor in both iPhones and iPads are also made up of these amazing chips from this outstanding developer.

What does Arm mean for computers?

ARM is a company that makes processors and one of the most popular processor manufacturers in the world. Their processors are designed to run low power while being fast, which makes them great for portable devices such as phones or tablets.

ARM is a direct competitor of Intel. Compared to Intel chips, ARM chips are cheaper because the licensing deals allow companies to produce their own processors.

Are ARM processors the future?

The future of ARM lies in portable machines. Starting from 2020, Apple has made its own chip called M1, which is based on ARM architecture. Apple switched to use M1 chip in all of their devices. That makes ARM future brighter than ever.

The Apple M1 is an ARM-based system on a chip designed by Apple Inc. as the CPU and GPU for its Macintosh computers and iPad Pro tablet.

In the past, Intel has dominated the market with their PC chips and it doesn’t seem like they plan to stop any time soon. Companies may be more inclined to purchase mobile phones that use these cheaper yet still powerful chips because then manufacturers would not have to license them from ARM or pay for royalties when manufacturing a chip in-house.

However, if consumers adopt Apple products rapidly (which seems likely), this could mean an increase in demand for ARM’s low power chips which would help maintain its competitive edge against Intel.

The final outcome depends on how people react to changes in technology and whether companies will find enough incentive to move away from what they know works well already–Intel’s processor design.